‘Black Cockatoo Crisis’ Social Impact Documentary by Jane Hammond Receives Brian Beaton Award 2021

Screenwest is pleased to announce that Western Australian filmmaker, journalist and life-long environmental activist, Jane Hammond, is the successful recipient of the 2021 Brian Beaton Award, to support her upcoming social impact documentary, Black Cockatoo Crisis.

The award was presented by Celia Tait and Brian Beaton’s family last night at the WA Screen Industry End of Year Celebration held at the Art Gallery of WA’s brand new rooftop venue.

The highly regarded Brian Beaton Award recognises the valuable contribution esteemed late documentary producer Brian Beaton made to the Western Australian screen industry. The award honours his memory by annually awarding a grant to filmmaker/s who have a current social impact project that needs further support to reach its full potential. A social impact project is one that has the potential to contribute positively to the community and instigate social change.

Black Cockatoo Crisis follows the plight of Western Australia’s three south west black cockatoo species and explores what can be done to save these birds from extinction. Their numbers have fallen dramatically over the past few decades and all three species could become extinct in just 20 years unless something is done to protect their habitats.

The filmmakers are working with the Save the Black Cockatoo Coalition and the WA Forest Alliance to call for urgent action to protect the habitat and food sources of the black cockatoos and protect them from slaughter, poisoning and starvation.

“It is an incredible honour to receive the Brian Beaton Award. This recognition will help get this important story to the big screen and move audiences to action. We need public pressure and political will to protect these iconic birds. Thank you to the Beaton family, Celia Tait, Screenwest and everyone who has contributed to this award.” said Jane Hammond, Recipient of Brian Beaton Award 2021 and Filmmaker.

Black Cockatoo Crisis will be Jane Hammond’s fourth long form environmental documentary following

Cry of the Forests (2020), A Crude Injustice (2017) and A Fractured State (2016). As both a filmmaker and journalist, she has a wealth of experience in telling stories of environmental justice, social affairs, science and politics. Jane has a passion for climate justice, human rights and equality.

“We congratulate Jane for her ongoing perseverance, tenacity and commitment to environmental causes through her filmmaking, and in particular to the preservation of the Black Cockatoo. Brian loved the natural environment. He lived in the Perth hills amongst the trees. We are thrilled that his legacy can support Jane in her endeavours to tell the story of these iconic birds, and in so doing help bring about lasting impact on their future.” said Celia Tait, Co-Founder of Brian Beaton Award and Executive Producer, Artemis Media.

Previous recipients of the Brian Beaton Award include Taryne Laffar and Sam Bodhi Field for Our Law, Sam Lara and Cathy Henkel for Laura’s Choice, Brooke Tia Silcox and Mat de Koning for 29 Years Eight Days and Dawn Jackson for Pointe: Dancing on the Knife’s Edge.

The Brian Beaton Award 2021 was made possible by Screenwest and Lotterywest, the generous support of the screen industry and the Screenwest Public Fund.

“A massive congratulations to Jane and a big thank you to Celia, the Beaton family and all of this year’s donors. The annual Brian Beaton Award is one of our most treasured funding grants and Screenwest is pleased to continue our ongoing commitment to it.” said Rikki Lea Bestall, Screenwest CEO.

The filmmakers have also launched a crowdfunding campaign via the Documentary Australia Foundation.

Filming for Black Cockatoo Crisis is currently underway and post-production is expected to begin in April with the film ready for release by June 2022.

More Stories
Young Adult Film, The Mystery of Dolphin Bay Kicks Off Filming in South East Queensland